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Dr. M. Shiham Adam

Dr. M. Shiham Adam

Director for Science & Maldives

Shiham holds a BSc in Marine Biology from Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) and an MSc in Fisheries Biology and Management form University College of North Wales is Bangor (UK). Upon completion of his PhD at the Imperial College, London, he worked as a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s Pelagic Fisheries Research Program modelling population dynamics and movements of tuna, before he finally returned to resume work in the Maldives at the Marine Research Centre in 2003.

Shiham was a founding trustee of the International Pole & Line Foundation, and is currently the Chair of IPNLF’s Scientific & Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as well as Director for Science & the Maldives. Shiham has also been leading the Marine Research Centre, the research institute of the Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture, Maldives, since 2005, during which time he has led the Pelagic Fisheries Research Program. In addition, he was also in charge of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation’s (SAARC) Coastal Zone Management Centre, Maldives, from 2008-2012.

Shiham was instrumental in getting the Maldivian pole-and-line tuna fishery certified with the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) and in ensuring that the requirements of the certification are met. In this regard, he is an advisor to the Maldives Seafood Processors and Exporters Association (MSPEA) in their effort to maintain the MSC certification.

He is well known within the international tuna community for his knowledge and experience in tropical tuna fisheries and for his work as an India Ocean coastal state member. He represents the Maldives regularly at the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) advocating the need for strengthening regional management of tuna stocks. He is the current Chair of the IOTC's Working Party on Tropical Tunas (WPTT) and Vice Chair of the IOTC Scientific Committee.

Major brands have made public commitments to sourcing sustainably caught tuna. Pole-and-line fishing is the most environmentally friendly method possible, and it is imperative that we use these commitments to both improve the lives of these fishing communities as well as the health of their fisheries.